2. Meeting Your Student

Think about the characteristics of the adult learner, and then think about meeting your new student for the first time. Remember, too, about managing the tutoring environment. Then think about the following:

  • Knowing that adults have a great deal to contribute toward their own learning, how might you plan that first meeting?
  • Where will you meet?
  • How will you dress?
  • What factors will drive these decisions?
  • How will you learn about your student's reading abilities and difficulties while putting her at ease?

    Point to ponder

    1. Think about what you already know about making a first impression and putting a new acquaintance at ease.

      Read about the first meeting. Choose one of the following:


      • Then, think about what you have learned in your readings about meeting an adult literacy student for the first time.

      • And finally, what do you still need to know about that first meeting? Are your questions program related? If so, you now have some of the questions you might ask your local adult literacy program. Jot them down, and save them for discussion in your meeting with the program manager prior to your first meeting with your student.

      18 comments:

      Queen Of My Castle said...

      As the literacy coordinator in our program, I plan to be present upon the first meeting to hopefully put both at ease. I would love to have seperate feedback from both the tutor and student regarding the items discussed in this section!

      Biltz said...

      I am planning to have some information from the coordinator about the student in advance so that I can plan for the first meeting. In general I would use this as a getting to know you session and try to set goals and discuss expectations.

      lillian said...

      I believe a profesional appearance is always best. I really liked that cultural quiz.

      Pat said...

      completed 3/26/09

      Kareemah said...

      The coordinator will assess the new learner, will provide me with guide materials, and inform me of the needs of the student as she understands them. She may be present at the first meeting. I will try to encourage some opening conversation about goals, expectations, and general subjects to get to know the person.

      neg said...

      This is hard to address because no one is like anyone else. Meet the person, see where they hope to go and decide how you can help them get there.

      SNelson said...

      The environment from which my students will come, dressing casually when I normally interact with them is the least of my concerns. My focus is to assist them in making the changes in their lives they feel knowing how to read will bring.

      Megan N said...

      I'm a little nervous, only because I am so young (18). I hope that everything goes well, my parents always say I'm funny so hopefully I can use some humor! Jeans and a cute top are always the best way to go, not to formal, not too casual. If I was being tutored I would not want to feel as if I was under-dressed. I mean, hey, it's just tutoring! No need to impress!

      Kenneth Zen Bodhi said...
      This comment has been removed by the author.
      LG said...

      Lots of good info...I feel strongly about the idea of the student having some successes in the first session. I think that sends a powerful, positive message to the learner that he/she can do it.

      LG said...

      Lots of good info...I feel strongly about the idea of the student having some successes in the first session. I think that sends a powerful, positive message to the learner that he/she can do it.

      lynette ohalleron said...

      I would imagine I will go into my first session with a participant, with some background info. I would dress business casual..not to dressy, but not sloppy either. I would try very hard to make the participant feel at ease and comfortable. I would hope that the first meeting with the participant (comfortable and friendly)will set the tone for all of our sessions.

      North Hills Member said...

      At the first meeting, should I a be asked about my concerns, I want to be able to say that I am working on speaking more slowly when tutoring or presenting to a small class. I think this is my biggest weakness, though it has helped in the past to tell students to feel free to tell me if I am speaking too fast.

      John Lynch said...

      Completed

      Wallace West said...

      I believe getting them to assess themselves is always a good way to start after the introductions because no matter what they say can assure them they will learn and are not that far behind as they think and start making them feel comfortable right away.

      Regina Cook said...

      I still need to obtain operational details: written tutor job description, reporting and assessment methods that are used, and the frequency of the same.

      One thing to add for comfort for my students will be the ability to speak freely at the first meeting and to not feel as though I am just another level of assessment - another hurdle, per say. Trust is paramount along with their perception of my credibility.

      Pamela Lee said...

      I am hoping to have some background on my student prior to our meeting.

      I plan to dress casually. I want to talk to the student about their goals - short-term initially and be encouraging that we, together, can work on and meet those goals.

      I may suggest items the student could bring to our first class - something that would be included in one of the short-term goals.

      MSTATEN said...

      I would like to have some prior knowledge on the student I will be working with. However, I'm excited about the initial meeting because I'm sure they will help me learn even more. I'll be sure to let them know and remind them often that questions and mistakes are completely fine. This is for their benefit and we will work together to accomplish their goals.