3. Where will you begin the first lesson with your student?

Imagine that you have just learned that you will be matched with a student as soon as you have completed this course. As you think about that first meeting, your initial excitement gives way to a nagging question: Where do I begin the lesson?

From the moment we meet someone new, we begin to assess the person through speech, mannerisms, and dress. With your learner, you also make judgments about her literacy skills based on writing samples, application forms, and word-of-mouth.

Remember, just as your are assessing your student, she is assessing you!

After years of failure in school, your learner will probably be paralyzed at the thought of taking a test. Yet, in order to teach her effectively, you will need to know where to begin in order to help her achieve her literacy goals. Your program's initial assessment of your student will be both formal and informal. Please click on the required links below and read them.

  • Formal Assessment
  • Progress Reports
  • Formal assessments are generally administered by trained staff. Your literacy organization will require you to send in progress reports at regular intervals. Collectively, these reports are the lifeblood of the organization, for they determine how well the program is helping to eradicate adult illiteracy in the community. Your progress reports influence how much money will be donated and how many grants can successfully be obtained, since these days donors look closely at successful results. The more funding the organization receives, the more students it can serve and the more tutors it can train.

    Diagnostic Inventory is an assessment that is widely distributed by ProLiteracy America to community-based and faith-based organizations. Read the teacher's guide closely, and "practice" giving the test to a friend or family member, before trying it with your new student. This inventory will give you a quick idea of where to start with your student in the first few lessons.

    We suggest that you put your student at ease before going through these exercises, especially if your student has just met you. Explain why these diagnostics are important and how starting at the right place will help them in the long run.



    Suggested Reading: Formative Assessment https://teal.ed.gov/tealguide/formativeassessment

    16 comments:

    Queen Of My Castle said...

    As the coordinator again here I hope to have a large impact on the materials to be covered in the beginning.

    Biltz said...

    This process makes good sense to me. I believe that only things that are measured get improved....

    lillian said...

    Assessments are necessary to help the student measure his/her own progress.

    Pat said...

    we need to make sure that the student understands that the assessments and progress reports are to help them not to judge them

    Gerri said...

    Very good info here. I think it is important for the student and the tutor to see what progress is being made.

    neg said...

    Nothing to hide-
    Hide nothing.

    SNelson said...

    Assessments are welcomed!

    Lynne B said...

    This process of evaluation will enable me to assess my student's progress and also how I am doing. Asking the student for feedback can only improve my abilities as a tutor.

    Megan N said...

    Seriously, my biggest fear is that my learner won't improve at all!!

    Kenneth Zen Bodhi said...

    I liked reading the perspective that the information provided.

    LG said...

    I have found that if you tell learners that they will be given a pre-test and, then, after a certain period of time, a post-test some students will strive to make those gains.

    John Lynch said...

    Completed

    Wallace West said...

    If you don't test you won't know the participants/students strengths and weaknesses, it's not all about pass and fail. Some aren't good test takers and you will need to help/mentor them on relaxation and focus techniques.

    Regina Cook said...

    I need to ask who delivers the initial assessment results to the student.

    Pamela Lee said...

    The program I volunteered with last year provided the student assessment so the tutor knew what lesson book to begin with. We were never to say "test" to a student to prevent fear and being discouraged. Follow-up assessments were completed by the tutor and reported monthly to the director. We were never to hold a student back, but we may move on and review the trouble areas repeatedly.

    I am looking forward to this program, but must admit I am a bit anxious about the lesson planning on my own. The other program had developed lessons. It still required preparation by the tutor, which included extra activities to assist in trouble areas.

    MSTATEN said...

    Already aware of this information for the most part. Director made sure to go over this with us.